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Shannon Hague, Massachusetts Social Worker

Shannon Hague has been a social worker in Massachusetts for the past 13 years. During that time she has helped keep countless children safe.

As far as Hague is concerned, social work has always been in her blood. Shannon’s mother was a social worker for MassHealth for 30 years, and her father worked in the prison system. As an undergraduate at Bridgewater State, Shannon took a few classes in social work and she fell in love with it. She later earned her graduate degree in social work from Bridgewater State.

The primary goal of social workers across Massachusetts (and the country) is to continually assess children’s safety and provide supportive services to them and their families.

During her career as a social worker, Hague has seen a wide variety of situations. Working with people, she says, has given her the opportunity to understand and try to anticipate human behavior, a skill that does not come easily. It’s important for social workers to be able to read a situation and provide a tailored approach for each family, she said.

When a social worker is assigned a case, the worker first assesses the child’s and the family’s needs and determines what services should be put in place. If a parent is struggling with multiple stressors, the Department may facilitate child care and connect them with a parenting partner to help them strengthen and improve their ability to parent.

While she was a social worker, Hague found gratification when she saw her clients succeed with the support that she was able to provide for them. Now, she is working as a supervisor and oversees six social workers, who each work with multiple families.

DCF strives to preserve families through reunification; however, if reunification is not possible, DCF creates a permanency plan for a child within 18-24 months which may include guardianship or adoption.

“I want to see children be healthy and safe and productive,” Hague said.

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