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Carin Smith served in the Army for 21 years before she retired to the south shore. One of the stops she made in her search for a civilian job was at the Plymouth Career Center.

Like thousands of Massachusetts veterans, Carin received special one-on-one counseling and participated in workshops and networking events to develop her career readiness skills and learn how to look for a job in today’s marketplace. Plymouth’s award winning online networking program “VetNet” showcased the talents and skills Carin could bring to the business sector and taught her how to use today’s technology in her job search.

Carin’s experiences at the Plymouth Career Center motivated her to take a position where she could help other veterans adjust to civilian life and find meaningful employment. She is now an integral member of the veteran’s services office for the town of Marshfield. Carin talks about her experiences in her job search in video below.

Written By:


Director, Department of Career Services

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