Post Content

disaster_preparedness1

 

 

 

 

In Honor of September – National Preparedness Month, let’s talk about DISASTER PREPAREDNESS FOR BUSINESS

Large and small employers should prepare for possible disasters. Whether a corporation with multiple locations and thousands of employees, or a small partnership with two employees, businesses can do much to prepare for the impact of the many hazards they face in today’s world. While many aspects of a disaster are unpredictable, that does not mean preparations should not be completed in advance. During major disasters, it is clear that those businesses that prepared in advance suffered less downtime and loss of revenue.  Here are some of the key areas to consider when conducting emergency preparedness:

• Be Informed – know the type of emergencies that might affect your business. Plan for what you will do in an emergency.
• Develop a Business Continuity Plan – determine what bare essentials you need to keep the business running. Develop back-up plans for all essential functions like your supply chain, and not just for IT. Decide in advance what you will do if your facility(s) is not accessible or does not have utilities.
• Prepare an Emergency Plan – this should include at a minimum: evacuation plans, shelter-in-place plans, means to communicate with your employees when they are not at work, instructions for how employees should handle emergencies (including medical emergencies), and site maps with utility and evacuation locations marked.
• Practice the Emergency Plan – during an emergency is NOT when you should be opening the plans to figure out what to do. Actors would not open the script on opening night. Athletes would not open the playbook for the first time on the field. Training and practice will help make sure everyone knows what to do and the execution of the plan is a success.
• Review Insurance Coverage – many businesses have been surprised after disasters to learn how little is covered. Review your insurance now and adjust it if appropriate.
• Secure Your Facility and Equipment – Make sure your people, products, supplies, building, and IT are secure.
• Promote Family and Individual Preparedness – This is the right thing to do and is good for business. If people and their families are secure and safe, they are more likely to return to work.

“It wasn’t hard to put together a plan, you just have to make it a priority.”
— Cathy Anderson-Giles, President and CEO

“We had trained in advance and knew what to do”
— Donna Childs, Founder and CEO

“And because we were ready, our customers never knew the difference”
— Jonathan Harlan, CEO

Visit ready.gov/business for more information, templates and instructions on how to develop plans, as well as other resources.

Written By:


Manager of Safety/Health, Department of Labor Standards

Tags: , , , , ,

Recent Posts

MA Regulation Requires Contractors to Work Lead-Safe by Preventing the Spread of Lead Dust During Renovation, Repair, and Painting Projects posted on Oct 17

MA Regulation Requires Contractors to Work Lead-Safe by Preventing the Spread of Lead Dust During Renovation, Repair, and Painting Projects

Homes and other structures built before 1978 may contain lead paint. Lead-contaminated dust can cause lead poisoning in children, pregnant women, contractors, and other workers, their families, and even pets.

Your New Voice on National Committee to Create Apprenticeships posted on Sep 12

Your New Voice on National Committee to Create Apprenticeships

The Department of Labor (DOL) has appointed David R. Wallace, Director of the Massachusetts Division of Apprentice Standards to serve on the Advisory Committee on Apprenticeships (ACA) chaired by DOL Secretary Thomas Perez to create job-driven career pathways and work-based learning opportunities for American workers. Wallace will join 24 others representing employers, labor unions and workers to help advance the President’s goals of the American apprenticeship initiative.

More Tools to Expand Economic Development in Massachusetts posted on Aug 13

More Tools to Expand Economic Development in Massachusetts

Governor Deval Patrick today signed in to law “An Act to Promote Economic Growth in the Commonwealth”–legislation that builds upon his strategy to grow the Massachusetts economy by investing in education, innovation and infrastructure.  Among the tools and initiatives in the economic development package is   …Continue Reading More Tools to Expand Economic Development in Massachusetts