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aerial liftMunicipal employees are subject to accidents and injuries while working in bucket trucks and aerial lifts to hang flags and decorations, trim trees, or make repairs to buildings or streetlights.  Some of the high hazards of working in bucket trucks or on any elevated work platform include electrocution, tip overs, and struck by passing traffic.

Remind all employees who will be working on an elevated work platform of some key safety points:
• Wear a harness and lifeline properly.
• Make sure the equipment is on stable ground. Avoid slopes, sandy or wet areas, and uneven surfaces.
• Never stand on the sides of the bucket or use a ladder in the bucket to extend reach.
• Do not put yourself or your equipment within 10 feet of power lines.
• Set up a safe work zone to prevent traffic from hitting the bucket truck.
• Use advance warning signs, cones, or barricades to protect your workers.

If the bucket truck is not regularly used, make sure you inspect it and test it. Look for leaks and check the hydraulics. Make sure that all the outriggers fully deploy, beacons, and lights function properly, and there are no missing parts. Above all, make sure the operator is well trained in the safe use of the equipment.

Learn more about Aerial Lift Operation.

Written By:


Manager of Safety/Health, Department of Labor Standards

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