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While most individuals play by the rules, some try to circumvent the system by collecting weekly unemployment benefits for which they are not eligible. Collecting unemployment benefits under the following scenarios would constitute fraud:

1.      After returning to work full-time

2.      While engaging full-time in starting a business

3.      While on vacation, being incarcerated or otherwise not available

4.      Not reporting earnings

Fraud Prevention

To prevent this from happening, the Department of Unemployment Assistance (DUA) matches records with those of other states and federal agencies, including the Social Security Administration, the Department of Corrections, and the Report of New Hires. DUA also investigates tips received from the Fraud Hotline of individuals working under the table while collecting unemployment benefits. 

There are serious consequences for committing unemployment fraud, including repaying benefits received, losing future benefits, possible fine and even jail time. 

Report Fraud

If you know of individuals who are collecting benefits while working full-time or employers who are paying workers under the table, please contact us.  You can be anonymous.  

1. Call the Fraud Hotline at 1-800-354-9927
2. Email uifraud@detma.org
3. Write to the U.I. Program Integrity Department, P.O. Box 8610, Boston, MA 02114.
4. Send fax to 617-723-5312

Have questions? 

If you are unsure about your situation or have questions about fraud, please contact the Fraud Hotline at 1-800-354-9927 to speak to an agent. 

Don’t let fraud happen to you! 

Written By:


Customer Outreach Director

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