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memorialOver 200 Massachusetts workers died over the past five years as a result of a fatal injury on the job. Behind this tragic number are hundreds if not thousands of family, friends, and co-workers who grieve the loss of their loved ones and colleagues.  On April 28 of every year, we take time to remember our fallen workers and reaffirm our mission to work to make workplaces safer.  Most fatal workplace accidents are the result of preventable hazards.  One death is too many.  Let us rededicate ourselves to workplace safety and health efforts, and in so doing, honor the dignity of work, the right to a safe workplace, and the memory of those whose lives were lost.

To learn more about improving workplace safety go to:

·         www.mass.gov/dols

·         www.osha.gov

Written By:


Director of the Department of Labor Standards

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