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The Supreme Judicial Court Committee on Grand Jury Proceedings solicits comments on a set of recommended best practices by prosecutors in making presentments to the grand jury.  The committee invites all comments on or before Monday, April 2, 2018.

As stated in Commonwealth v. Grassie, 476 Mass. 202 (2017), the committee was appointed to gather information about current practices and to attempt to identify best practices in regards to grand jury presentments.

The proposed best practices, and commentary on the law and practice in support of these, may be accessed from this link.

Comments should be directed to: Maureen McGee, Supreme Judicial Court, John Adams Courthouse, One Pemberton Square, Boston, MA 02108 on or before April 2, 2018.  Comments may also be sent by email to: maureen.mcgee@jud.state.ma.us.  Comments received will be made available to the public.

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