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Massachusetts regulations (105 CMR 590.007) follow the federal Food and Drug Administration’s Food Code (1999 edition) (section 6-501.115), which states that “live animals may not be allowed on the premises of a food establishment”, with certain exceptions, which include fish in aquariums or edible seafood under refrigeration or on display, live fish bait, patrol dogs accompanying police or security officers, and service animals in dining areas.

A “food establishment” is defined in Massachusetts regulations (105 CMR 590.002) as “an operation that stores, prepares, packages, services, vends, or otherwise provides food for human consumption.”  This includes restaurants and grocery stores, as well as transportation vehicles involved in their operation.

The only exception that applies to most consumers involves their “service animals”.

For information about this, see the Massachusetts Trial Court Law Libraries “Law About Service Animals”.

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