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The Massachusetts Supreme Judicial Court issued an important decision this week regarding access to a decedent’s email.  The case of  Ajemian v. Yahoo arose after Robert Ajemian died in a bicycle accident and left no will.  His siblings were named the personal representatives of the estate, and they sought access to his Yahoo email account to determine how their brother wanted his estate distributed.   Yahoo denied their request saying it was prohibited from doing so under the federal Stored Communications Act.  The court ruled that “the SCA does not prohibit such disclosure.”  In its decision, the court analyzed the federal statute and the terms of the service agreement in order to reach its conclusion.

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