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Tour companies offering sight-seeing via amphibious vehicles, commonly known as duck boats, are required to add safety features and regulations while tourists are aboard and traveling on public thoroughfares.

Signed by Governor Charlie Baker last Thursday, December 8, the new law requires the vehicles, based on a World War II-era design, to be equipped with “blind spot cameras and proximity sensors.”

In addition, tour guides may not identify landmarks, provide narration, history or entertainment while operating the vehicles.

The popular attraction gained scrutiny after a fatality involving a motorbike operator in April 2016.

The changes take effect next April 1, 2017.

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