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“As It Could and Should Be” 18.5" x 31.5" x 2.5" Joyce Lauro Wall tile dimensions Ceramic with oxide and glazed finishes This is one 3-dimensional piece with three distinct sections. The top third of the piece features blue spiral shapes of various sizes. The middle section features a maze holding flexible ovals. The lower third of the piece is a mix of both top and middle shapes.

“As It Could and Should Be”

Artist: Joyce Lauro, Canton

Description: 18.5″ x 31.5″ x 2.5″ Wall tile dimensions. Ceramic with oxide and glazed finishes

Artist Statement: My ceramic relief piece, “As It Should and Could Be” is a conversation about those presenting emotional, developmental or physical disabilities and the barriers and stigmas they are subjected to from others. Averted eyes, non-acknowledgement, talking “down,” limited interaction and even avoidance of typical persons towards those with disabilities are everyday occurrences. Major barriers to access in mobility in Boston are snow banks and cobblestones represented in the beginning of maze section.

The top third of the relief references the shapes of parts of wheelchairs (parts of parking logo) and the physical barriers those with mobility challenges face. They represent not only the obviously visible and physical but also the unseen disadvantages experienced by all those with various disabilities. The middle maze section of flexible ovals representing “typical persons” is difficult to traverse but less so for those who are privileged and able to adapt more easily. The lower third of the relief is a mix of both top and middle shapes, leading the viewer to the question of how did all the parts make it across the obstacles to settle in a space which values all equally?

About the Artist: Joyce Lauro is primarily a ceramic artist and a current MAT graduate student at Massachusetts College of Art and Design. Her work has been exhibited in local, national and international group shows. She has taught both children and adults with disabilities for a number of years and is a parent of a child with autism.

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