MOD Blog

Massachusetts Office On Disability Blog

Category Archives: Rights

Accessible Polling Places Posted on Oct 3

Accessible Polling Places

In this important election season, it is timely to consider polling place accessibility for persons with disabilities. Throughout the years, our office has received calls from the public regarding polling place accessibility and has worked to remove barriers. Some of the more common issues have   …Continue Reading Accessible Polling Places

Honoring Disability History Month in October: Part Four: 1990-Present Posted on Oct 23

Honoring Disability History Month in October: Part Four: 1990-Present

The Massachusetts Office on Disability (MOD) is pleased to present our month-long blog series that will provide a brief history of significant disability policies, developments, and figures in the United States and Massachusetts throughout the past two centuries. Under Massachusetts General Law Chapter 6 Section 15LLLLL, the month   …Continue Reading Honoring Disability History Month in October: Part Four: 1990-Present

Honoring Disability History Month in October: Part Three: 1960-1990 Posted on Oct 16

Honoring Disability History Month in October: Part Three: 1960-1990

The Massachusetts Office on Disability (MOD) is pleased to present our month-long blog series that will provide a brief history of significant disability policies, developments, and figures in the United States and Massachusetts throughout the past two centuries. Under Massachusetts General Law Chapter 6 Section 15LLLLL, the month of October commemorates Disability History Month. Welcome to Part Three: 1960-1990. The 1960s saw the emergence of the disability rights movement in America. The following decades brought the Independent Living movement and protests against discrimination in the form of physical and social barriers. The tireless efforts of disability rights advocates over those several decades would culminate in the passage of the most comprehensive civil rights law for persons with disabilities in history. Further, many of Massachusetts’ important agencies serving the disability community, including MOD were founded over this period.

Honoring Disability History Month in October: Part Two: 1900-1960 Posted on Oct 9

Honoring Disability History Month in October: Part Two: 1900-1960

The Massachusetts Office on Disability (MOD) is pleased to present our month-long blog series that will provide a brief history of significant disability policies, developments, and figures in the United States and Massachusetts throughout the past two centuries. Under Massachusetts General Law Chapter 6 Section 15LLLLL, the month of October commemorates Disability History Month.
Welcome to Part Two: 1900-1960. The first half of the 20th century brought the devastation of two World Wars which sent many Americans home with permanent disabilities. The unprecedented U.S. polio epidemics would leave countless more individuals with disabling conditions, many of whom would go on to lead the disability rights movement. Massachusetts was home to many important “firsts” in disability history during this time. The period also brought advancements in science and medicine as well as social programs and policies to support people with disabilities but a long road lay ahead in terms of equal access, societal attitudes towards disability and quality of life for persons with disabilities.

Honoring Disability History Month in October: Part One: 1776-1900 Posted on Oct 2

Honoring Disability History Month in October: Part One: 1776-1900

The Massachusetts Office on Disability (MOD) is pleased to present our month-long blog series that will provide a brief history of significant disability policies, developments, and figures in the United States and Massachusetts throughout the past two centuries. Under Massachusetts General Law Chapter 6 Section   …Continue Reading Honoring Disability History Month in October: Part One: 1776-1900

Emotional Support Animal Vs. Service Animal: The Facts Posted on Jul 22

Emotional Support Animal Vs. Service Animal: The Facts

Last week, we highlighted some new guidance on service animals from the U.S. Department of Justice (DOJ). In this second post in our series on service animals, we will aim to clear up confusion surrounding the different categories of animals that assist persons with disabilities. MOD consistently gets calls from individuals who benefit from the assistance or company of an animal. Callers often refer to any animal that mitigates or relieves their disability limitations as a “service animal.” However, technically not all animals that benefit a person with a disability are service animals. Service animals are specifically defined by and are subject to different laws than other animals that provide companionship and or emotional support to persons with disabilities.

U.S. Department of Justice Releases New Service Animal FAQ Posted on Jul 15

U.S. Department of Justice Releases New Service Animal FAQ

The Massachusetts Office on Disability (MOD) regularly responds to service animal related questions from the public. So, we are pleased to share a new update with you. The U.S. Department of Justice (DOJ) published new, comprehensive guidance entitled “Frequently Asked Questions (FAQ) about Service Animals and the ADA” on July 13, 2015. The FAQ addresses the application of the law in areas that were previously unclear and is unique in that it is the first guidance to discuss specific questions asked by the public about service animals. Here are some highlights that our staff consider particularly noteworthy.

Requesting Reasonable Accommodations at Work: “Dos & Don’ts” Posted on Jun 29

Requesting Reasonable Accommodations at Work: “Dos & Don’ts”

You may be entitled to reasonable accommodations that will enable you to enjoy equal employment opportunities. In general, a reasonable accommodation is a modification to the way things are typically done or to the physical work environment that would enable a qualified person with a disability to apply for a job, perform the essential functions of the position, and or to benefit equally from the privileges of employment.