MOD Blog

Massachusetts Office On Disability Blog

Category Archives: Rights

Emotional Support Animal Vs. Service Animal: The Facts Posted on Jul 22

Emotional Support Animal Vs. Service Animal: The Facts

Last week, we highlighted some new guidance on service animals from the U.S. Department of Justice (DOJ). In this second post in our series on service animals, we will aim to clear up confusion surrounding the different categories of animals that assist persons with disabilities. MOD consistently gets calls from individuals who benefit from the assistance or company of an animal. Callers often refer to any animal that mitigates or relieves their disability limitations as a “service animal.” However, technically not all animals that benefit a person with a disability are service animals. Service animals are specifically defined by and are subject to different laws than other animals that provide companionship and or emotional support to persons with disabilities.

U.S. Department of Justice Releases New Service Animal FAQ Posted on Jul 15

U.S. Department of Justice Releases New Service Animal FAQ

The Massachusetts Office on Disability (MOD) regularly responds to service animal related questions from the public. So, we are pleased to share a new update with you. The U.S. Department of Justice (DOJ) published new, comprehensive guidance entitled “Frequently Asked Questions (FAQ) about Service Animals and the ADA” on July 13, 2015. The FAQ addresses the application of the law in areas that were previously unclear and is unique in that it is the first guidance to discuss specific questions asked by the public about service animals. Here are some highlights that our staff consider particularly noteworthy.

Requesting Reasonable Accommodations at Work: “Dos & Don’ts” Posted on Jun 29

Requesting Reasonable Accommodations at Work: “Dos & Don’ts”

You may be entitled to reasonable accommodations that will enable you to enjoy equal employment opportunities. In general, a reasonable accommodation is a modification to the way things are typically done or to the physical work environment that would enable a qualified person with a disability to apply for a job, perform the essential functions of the position, and or to benefit equally from the privileges of employment.