Post Content

Massachusetts General Law recognizes May as Lupus Awareness Month.  Although Lupus affects approximately 1.5 million Americans, challenges remain regarding awareness and accurate knowledge about the disease.  Lupus is a chronic autoimmune disease that causes a person’s own immune system to attack their tissues, which damages the tissues and produces widespread inflammation.

Lupus disproportionately affects younger women and in particular, women of color. Over 90% of individuals with lupus are women, most of which are between the ages of 15 to 44.  Women of color are two to three times more at risk for lupus than Caucasian women.

There are four different types of Lupus, with Systemic Lupus Erythematosus (SLE) accounting for over 70% of all cases. Individuals with SLE may experience symptoms including, but not limited to, fatigue, headaches, chest pain, fever, anemia, swelling in joints, and skin rashes. Symptoms are often characterized by flares and remissions and are likely to affect the joints, skin, brain, lungs, kidneys, and blood vessels.

For every one male affected, four to twelve females are affected by SLE. Blacks, Hispanics, Asians, and American Indians/Alaska Natives are more likely to be affected than Caucasians. Individuals with a family history of SLE may be at greater risk of developing SLE[i].

Currently, there is no cure for lupus, but with treatments most individuals are able to live active and healthy lives. People with Lupus may have protections under the Americans with Disabilities Act and other disability rights laws.

For more information, visit the  Centers for Disease Control and Prevention page on Lupus.

Please share this post to help spread awareness.

Don’t miss an MOD blog post! Sign up for email alerts here.

Your feedback is important! Please take our brief, 5-question survey HERE.

On Twitter? Follow us @Massdisability for updates and more blog posts!


[i] The National Resource Center on Lupus

Tags: ,

Recent Posts

Commonwealth Disability Mentoring Week 2018 posted on May 29

The Massachusetts Office on Disability (MOD) and the Human Resources Division (HRD) are partnering to host a second annual “Disability Mentoring Week (DMW),” a chance for people with disabilities to access and explore career development opportunities within state government. During DMW, mentees with disabilities are matched with workplace mentors according to expressed career interests. Mentees participate in a career exploration experience and make connections with mentors and other personnel. Employers gain increased awareness and understanding of how people with disabilities can be involved in their candidate recruitment processes.

Accessible Routes in Play Areas posted on May 27

This post will cover the accessible route requirements for play areas.  Specifically, I want to take a look at the requirements for the provision of an accessible route to and around the play equipment as laid out under the 2006 revision of the Massachusetts Architectural   …Continue Reading Accessible Routes in Play Areas

5 Ways to Improve Event Accessibility posted on May 25

5 Ways to Improve Event Accessibility

Participation in civic and social events is an important part of community life. Public and private entities with obligations under the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) have an obligation to ensure that events and meetings open to the public are accessible to anyone who may want to attend. Here we outline a few basic steps entities can take to improve access.