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Massachusetts law requires that all children have a vision screening or comprehensive eye exam done before starting kindergarten.  Many children experience vision problems and this can have an impact on their ability to learn in school and at home.  We wish and hope that our children will have the ability to verbally explain that they are having difficulty with their vision.  However, this is not the case as they may not know what normal vision is!

Parents or guardians can enhance their awareness of the potential signs of poor vision by watching for early warning signs such as:

  • Head tilting
  • Eye rubbing
  • Squinting
  • Headaches
  • Sensitivity to light
  • Eyes crossing
  • Holding a book or other object too close
  • Standing very close to the television
  • Missed developmental milestones (developmental delay)

If you are concerned about your child’s vision, or, if your child’s sister, brother or parent had a vision problem as a young child, make an appointment with your child’s health care provider or nurse practitioner.  And, don’t forget that vision screening is part of the child’s routine exam—ask about your child’s vision.  If your child does not pass the vision screening, make an appointment with an eye specialist. Your doctor’s office can help you with this.

Remember – some vision problems may not have any warning signs!  . Some childhood vision problems may lead to permanent vision loss.  An early vision screening is the only way to detect a problem before it’s too late.

Make sure your child is screened before he or she starts kindergarten! Make sure your child is seeing well to learn!

For more information on vision, visit the Children Vision Massachusetts.

 

Written By:


Health and Human Service Coordinator

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