Post Content

 

KatieGorodetsky

 

Posted by: Katie Gorodetsky, WIC Immunization Coordinator

 

Domestic violence is a serious public health issue that affects millions of people in America. Closer to home, nearly one in three women in Massachusetts report experiencing domestic violence at some point in their lives. But domestic violence is more than physical abuse – it’s defined as a pattern of coercive and controlling behaviors and tactics used by one person over another to gain power and control. This may include verbal, financial, emotional, sexual, and physical abuse. Domestic violence occurs in heterosexual, as well as same-sex partnerships, and crosses all ethnic, racial and socio-economic lines. Domestic violence includes a wide range of behaviors in which one individual is using power and control to manipulate another individual, and it’s important to be able to recognize abuse and to seek help.

There are many terms that can be used to describe domestic violence/partner abuse, but it is important to remember that domestic violence is a pattern of controlling behavior, not just one single act. Arguments, disagreements, and their resolution are a normal part of healthy, respectful and equal relationships. But violence and abuse – or even the threat of violence and abuse – is not. When the term “domestic dispute” is used to describe domestic violence/partner abuse, responsibility is shifted from the perpetrator to both parties involved. It’s never acceptable when one person tries to control the thoughts, beliefs, or actions of a partner, friend, or any other person close to them.

Domestic violence/partner abuse is a deep seated, complex societal and personal issue. To make a difference as an individual, learn about the issue so you can support someone you know who is experiencing domestic violence and be committed to taking a stand against violence and abuse. Get involved by joining local and community efforts to bring the issue to the forefront, and push for societal change. Check out the ways in which you can help. The Jane Doe website below has some ways in which you can get involved. You can also learn more about domestic violence through the Department of Public Health’s web site: www.mass.gov/dph/violence

If you know someone who is or may be a victim of domestic violence/partner abuse, please visit http://www.janedoe.org/  or http://www.mass.gov/eopss/crime-prev-personal-sfty/personal-sfty/sexual-and-dom-viol/

 

Written By:

Recent Posts

Tracking the Latest Environmental Health Trends in MA posted on Jun 19

Massachusetts Environmental Public Health Tracking (EPHT) is a program that brings together environmental health data to inform residents about health and the environment in their community and throughout the state. Our program, now 16 years old, has a wealth of environmental health information available and   …Continue Reading Tracking the Latest Environmental Health Trends in MA

Highlights of the June 13th Public Health Council Meeting posted on Jun 13

The June monthly meeting of the Public Health Council included a Determination of Need request, updates on the status of preliminary and final public health regulations, and an informational presentation from DPH staff. First, the Council took up a Determination of Need request from Massachusetts General   …Continue Reading Highlights of the June 13th Public Health Council Meeting

Picky Eating—Not Fun for Anyone! posted on Jun 13

Picky Eating—Not Fun for Anyone!

By Terri Mendoza & Raychel Adreani Does your child stick to a few favorite foods and refuse to try anything new?   Like many parents, you may be dealing with picky eating.  We know it can be frustrating and challenging, and you probably worry that your   …Continue Reading Picky Eating—Not Fun for Anyone!