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LarryMadoffPosted by Larry Madoff, MD, Interim Director of the Bureau of Laboratory Sciences 

 

The Department of Public Health is comprised of ten bureaus and hundreds of programs, each dedicated to a particular component of promoting and protecting the public’s health.  While DPH staff are on the forefront of countless efforts to promote wellness for residents across the Commonwealth, there is some less visible, yet equally important, work being done every day by the staff of the State Lab. 

The Bureau of Laboratory Sciences, housed at the William A. Hinton State Laboratory in Jamaica Plain, provides diagnosis, surveillance, investigation and prevention for a wide range of substances and diseases including foodborne illness, lead poisoning, tuberculosis and HIV.

Moving forward, we are going to use this space to highlight what happens behind the scenes at the state Lab – like how we test a bat for rabies, run tests for STDs, or figure out if that hamburger you ate last night is what gave you food poisoning.

Stay tuned! 

 

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