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Bigby_JudyAnn_2Posted by:
JudyAnn Bigby, MD, Secretary of Health and Human Services

 

I’m lucky to be able to spend a lot of time with my mother because she lives close by.  Not everyone is so fortunate, though, as I was reminded by a blog post I read this week on boston.com.

 

Essentially, the wonderful organization Meals on Wheels is urging all of us this Mother’s Day to remember older seniors who don’t have family living nearby, and offer them support.  Through the Meals on Wheels’ “Meals for Moms” campaign, even if you can’t visit one of the mothers the program serves, you can send an e-bouquet with a message to a mother. Meals on Wheels will print out and deliver the messages for moms who may not have computer access.

 

It’s especially important that Massachusetts addresses the needs of elder female residents.  The percentage of Commonwealth residents who are seniors is expected to rise from 20% to 25% over the next decade, and almost 60% of these seniors are women.

 

Supporting our seniors might mean donating to an organization that benefits elders in honor of your mother or another important woman in your life, but it also might mean lending a helping hand to your neighbors or other seniors in your local community.  For women seniors living alone, a simple knock on the door or a card could brighten up their Mother’s Day.

 

While Meals on Wheels focuses on providing needed food to seniors, it is important that as a community we work together to ensure the physical, financial, and emotional health of elders over the long term.  In that capacity, I’m happy the Patrick-Murray Administration and the Executive Office of Elder Affairs have recently developed an “Aging Agenda” to ensure the health of our state’s seniors.

 

Together, we all can take steps toward improving the lives of seniors who live alone.  This Mother’s Day, that step can start with a knock on the door.

 

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health communication writer and editor

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