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We have received many questions about the difference between the H1N1 flu shot and the H1N1 nasal spray vaccine and who can receive each type of vaccine.

 

The H1N1 flu shot in an inactivated vaccine, which means that it contains killed virus. The shot is given with a needle, usually in the arm. The flu shot is approved for use in people 6 months of age and older, including healthy people, people with chronic medical conditions and pregnant women. You can find more information on the H1N1 flu shot at http://www.cdc.gov/vaccines/pubs/vis/downloads/vis-inact-h1n1.pdf.

 

The H1N1 nasal spray flu vaccine is made with live, weakened viruses that do not cause the flu. The spray is sometimes called LAIV for "live attenuated influenza vaccine." The spray is approved for use in healthy people 2 years to 49 years of age who are not pregnant. You can find more information the H1N1 nasal spray vaccine at http://www.cdc.gov/vaccines/pubs/vis/downloads/vis-laiv-h1n1.pdf .

 

The same manufacturers who produce seasonal vaccines are producing the H1N1 vaccines this season. Both the H1N1 flu shot and H1N1 nasal spray are being made in the same way that the seasonal shot and spray are made.  

 

Please remember that while we encourage all residents to utilize the comments section on this blog, DPH will no longer be able to respond to specific questions and comments.

Written By:


Communications Office

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