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NIVW December blog and tweet imageAs the busy schedule of the holiday season approaches, now is a great time to get a flu vaccine if you have not gotten vaccinated yet. A flu vaccine can protect you and your loved ones. Everyone 6 months of age and older should get a flu vaccine every year. While seasonal flu activity varies, flu activity usually peaks between December and February, though activity can last as late as May. As long as flu activity is ongoing, it’s not too late to get vaccinated, even in January or later.

There is some new information about flu vaccine this year:

  • Only injectable flu vaccine is recommended this season. The nasal spray is not recommended this flu season because of concerns about its effectiveness.
  • Flu vaccines have been updated to better match circulating viruses.
  • The recommendations for people with egg allergies have changed.
    • People who have experienced only hives after exposure to egg can get any licensed and recommended flu vaccine that is otherwise appropriate for their age and health.
    • People who have symptoms other than hives after exposure to eggs, including anaphylaxis, can also get any licensed and recommended flu vaccine that is otherwise appropriate for their age and health, but the vaccine should be given in a medical setting and be supervised by a health care provider who is able to recognize and manage severe allergic conditions. (Settings include hospitals, clinics, and physician offices). People with egg allergies no longer have to wait 30 minutes after receiving their vaccine.

BlogAthon_BadgeRemember that an annual flu vaccine is the best way to protect against this potentially serious disease. Getting vaccinated yourself also protects people around you, including those who are more vulnerable to serious flu illness, like babies and young children, older people, people with certain chronic health conditions, and pregnant women. Even if you have already gotten sick with flu this season, it is still a good idea to get a flu vaccine. Flu vaccines protect against three or four different flu viruses (depending on which flu vaccine you get).

It’s not too late to get a flu vaccine to protect yourself and your loved ones this flu season! Find out where you can get a flu vaccine by asking your primary care provider, going to a local pharmacy, or visiting https://vaccinefinder.org/ or mylocalclinic.com.

Written By:


Immunization Outreach Coordinator in the Bureau of Infectious Disease

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