Post Content

Katia small Written by Katia Powell, a Doctoral student in Public Policy and an intern at the Massachusetts Department of Public Health
 
 

 We’ve all heard that physical activity is “good” for us and has lots of health benefits. If everyone knows all that, why aren’t more of us physically active? I’ve heard (and given) a lot of excuses: we don’t’ have enough time; don’t feel like it; are too stressed; or think it’s boring. In the same breath we say we want to be healthy, lose weight, tone-up, or as some have put it, “look like a Kardashian.”

The simple fact is that we have to move to lose. Getting in shape doesn’t happen overnight – it takes hard work, patience and dedication. I’m speaking from experience – I used to be the queen of excuses. I used them all, sometimes using more than one at a time. When I first began my weight loss journey I tried to fight back the excuses by putting on my headphones and starting with cardio exercises. As my weight started to drop off, so did the reasons I used to avoid working out. The more active I became, the more open I was to trying new things, such as kickboxing classes and weight training so I could build muscle while shedding pounds.

To keep in shape, I attend a bootcamp 3-4 times a week. While bootcamp is not for everyone, attending some type of group-based physical activity can keep you motivated and give you support from others who share the same goals.

People that know me understand how dedicated I am to improving my health and the health of others. It’s not easy, and there are days I would rather just stay in bed or visit my two favorite men, Ben & Jerry. I have to constantly remind myself that we’re only given one body – if we treat it right, our body will return the favor by keeping us healthy. Whether it’s bootcamp, Zumba, stairclimbing, weight lifting or walking, it’s important for us all to be “good” to ourselves and our health – our bodies deserve it! What do you do to keep your body happy?

 

 

Written By:

Recent Posts

The Three Most Important Things to Remember About Stroke posted on Oct 29

The Three Most Important Things to Remember About Stroke

A stroke can be life-changing event and can happen to anyone. Remembering how to prevent stroke and how to recognize signs of stroke is a meaningful way to honor World Stroke Day. A stroke occurs when a blood vessel that carries oxygen to the brain   …Continue Reading The Three Most Important Things to Remember About Stroke

Your Best Protection Against the Flu: A Flu Shot posted on Oct 8

Your Best Protection Against the Flu: A Flu Shot

This year, the first full week of October marks the start of Massachusetts’ flu surveillance monitoring and reporting for the 2019-2020 flu season. To monitor flu in the state, DPH uses a variety of disease surveillance methods including lab testing, voluntary reporting by health care   …Continue Reading Your Best Protection Against the Flu: A Flu Shot

Personal Preparedness: Where to Start posted on Sep 27

Personal Preparedness: Where to Start

Preparing for emergencies is something that we all should do, yet it’s rarely considered a priority for most and tends to fall by the wayside. We see the possibility of a massive hurricane hurtling toward our neighbors to the south, and breathe a sigh of   …Continue Reading Personal Preparedness: Where to Start