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Bre run  Posted by Brianne Beagan, an Epidemiologist for the Massachusetts Department of Public Health

 

I have been a runner for a few years now – but that wasn’t always the case.  

I started out by jogging around my neighborhood –the more I jogged, the further I wanted to go. I began entering small races and 5k’s, and eventually worked my way up to 10k’s, half-marathons and marathons. I won’t say it’s always been easy, but it has been fun! These few simple tips helped me along my way: start slow; find a plan and a race; and enjoy the ride.

Start slow:

Many beginners run into the problem of trying to do too much too fast. This can cause you to get frustrated or hurt, and can lead to an “I hate running” attitude. So start slowly. For about a month, walk a few days a week for 30 minutes. After you have been walking for a few weeks you can slowly build up to jogging by switching back and fort between jogging and walking for about 30 minutes each day, a couple times a week.

Find a plan and a race:

To get the most out of your training, don’t wing it – pick a plan and follow it. The Cool Running website offers a great program called The Couch-to-5K ® Running Plan. This plan is simple, straightforward and gets the job done. The website also has a list of all upcoming races, for people on foot or in a wheelchair, in the area including:

Enjoy the ride:

Whether you walk, jog or run – they are all great ways to enjoy the rest of summer while burning extra calories. In fact, walking one mile a day just four days a week can burn up to 400 calories per week!

Most importantly, give yourself credit. Bart Yasso, a renowned runner, once said “I often hear someone say ‘I’m not a real runner.’ We are all runners, some just run faster than others. I never met a fake runner.” Enjoy the ride, even if it is a slow and steady journey. Anybody can be a runner – you just need to try.

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