Post Content

Kara Ryan

  Kara Ghiringhelli, Department of Public Health


Kara Ghiringhelli is a Nutrition Education Specialist at DPH

Americans have a love for sugar. The average American typically eats or drinks about 22 teaspoons of added sugar every day, with sugary beverages being the #1 source.

With sugar consumption on the rise, the American Heart Association recently published updated guidelines on the amount of added sugar we should limit ourselves to every day. The American Heart Association defines added sugar as, ‘sugars or syrups added to foods at the table, during processing, or during preparation.’ In other words, added sugars aren’t found naturally in foods, they are added to make foods even sweeter and tastier. The American Heart Association recommends women consume less than 100 calories or 6 teaspoons of added sugar a day and men consume less than 150 calories or 9 teaspoons of added sugar a day. If the average American is consuming 22 teaspoons a day of added sugar, we are in need of some serious help! Including me, a sweet tooth at heart.

Since these new guidelines were released, it has me thinking, maybe I should re-evaluate my own sugar intake. If you have been trying to limit your daily sugar intake and have tips you’d like to share, we’d love to hear from you!

Recent Posts

Weekly Flu Report, October 21, 2016 posted on Oct 21

Hello and welcome back to another flu season’s worth of Weekly Flu Reports. Each Friday from now through May you can check back here to see the latest information on the impact of flu in communities across Massachusetts. To kick things off, the first Weekly Flu   …Continue Reading Weekly Flu Report, October 21, 2016

Highlights of the October 20th Public Health Council Meeting posted on Oct 20

The October monthly meeting of the Public Health Council included a pair of Determination of Need requests, two votes on final amendments to regulations, and three informational briefings for Council members on the status of proposed regulatory amendments which have yet to come for a   …Continue Reading Highlights of the October 20th Public Health Council Meeting

Domestic Violence Awareness Month posted on Oct 17

Domestic Violence Awareness Month

Many women experiencing domestic violence suffer in silence.  October is Domestic Violence Awareness Month and the opportunity to shine the light on a public health issue impacting millions of people in America.  Women experiencing domestic violence no longer need to suffer in silence; always remember   …Continue Reading Domestic Violence Awareness Month