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The village market’s teeming, once again with lively folk, as New England’s hardy souls are loosed from winter’s yoke.*

buylocalIf you’re like me, you felt as though winter would never end. And for those who relish wintertime, perhaps even they had a little too much of a “good thing.” 

starwberries

Now that Old Man Winter has given way, slowly and reluctantly to spring, we can look forward to more fresh produce at our local farmers’ markets. Seasonal markets are open now (or opening soon), and the year-round markets are expanding their selection to include a better variety of locally grown produce.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERAIf you’re not already familiar with your local farms and markets, you may be surprised just how convenient locally grown produce is. Click here — Mass. Availability Chart — to find out what fresh fruits, vegetables, and other farm treats are in season.  

Just for fun, we did a quick search on the MassGrown site for farmers’ markets in Mass in Motion communities, and turned up some great spots for fresh, healthy food:

 

If none of those markets is near you, don’t fret — there are hundreds farms and markets across the Commonwealth. To find a fresh produce near you, just click here — MassGrown — and search by your town. You may also search for farms by type (e.g., greenhouse, organic farm, dairy farm, etc.), or by crop or product (e.g., dairy; milk, eggs, cheese, etc.). Some farms offer community supported agriculture programs (CSAs), a great way to ensure you receive fresh produce regularly.

buyfreshMany farms and markets feature entertainment, children’s activities, or other attractions, in addition to fresh produce. So, get searching for a farm or market near you and discover what you’ve been missing. See you at the market!

*Adapted from Spring Comes to Spiddal, by Mike Scott.

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Ted works in communications for the Division of Prevention and Wellness at the Massachusetts Department of Public Health.

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