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HeatherCatledge

 

Heather Catledge, WIC Nutritionist

Milk

 

The only thing “whole” about whole milk is a whole lot of calories, saturated fat, and cholesterol. By switching to low-fat or fat-free milk, you cut calories, fat, and cholesterol but keep the great health benefits milk has to offer. I tried a blind taste test with my family. No one could tell the difference! This shows how the mind can fool you. If you can’t see the colors of the bottle tops or labels of the different types of milk, “taste is all in the mind.”

Want to MOOOOVE from whole milk to lower fat milk? Try these steps, but take your time. Mix whole milk with 2% reduced fat milk for a week or two (you can even keep the whole milk cap on the bottle). Start by mixing the two milks in equal portions and every few days use less whole milk and more 2% milk. By the end of the week or two, use only 2% milk.

Over the next few weeks, try mixing 2% milk with 1% low-fat milk in the same way, so that by the end of the week, only 1% milk will be in the bottle (again, you may want to keep the 2% milk cap on the bottle).

You may want to stick with 1% milk at this point, or you can try mixing 1% with skim milk. Do it the same way you did before, by mixing the two types for 1 to 2 weeks.

If you’re sensitive to lactose, you can try these suggestions using low-fat and fat-free lactose-free milk!

Now that I’ve taken the mystery out of low-fat milk, are you willing to make the change with your family? Let us know!

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