Post Content

Lani blog Posted by:

 

When I hear nutrition experts say that Americans consume too much sodium, my first thought is always, “I wish Dad would stop adding so much salt to his meals!” Not because it insults my mother’s cooking, but because too much sodium in your diet raises your risk for high blood pressure and heart disease.

Then I became aware of an interesting fact. Only a small percentage of sodium comes from salt we add at the table. Almost 80% of the sodium in our diets is added by food manufacturers and restaurants during processing and cooking. Many of these foods pack a lot more sodium than we think. That means we could be eating dangerously high levels of sodium without picking up the salt shaker.

The recommended level of sodium intake for adults is between 1500-2300 mg per day. Here are some tips to lower the amount of sodium you take in:

  • When grocery shopping, compare labels and choose items with lower sodium numbers.
  • When buying frozen meals, compare sodium levels on the Nutrition Facts Label. Choose the items with the smallest numbers in sodium (less than 480 mg of sodium per serving is recommended).
  • Choose fresh meats. Bacon, lunchmeats, sausage, ham and hot dogs are all high in sodium.
  • Go fresh! Fresh and frozen vegetables have less sodium than canned vegetables. 
  • Look for products marked “no salt added” or “low sodium,” particularly bread, salad dressings and soup items.
  • When eating out, ask for foods to be prepared without added salt.
  •  Prepare more meals at home. This way, you can control how much salt you put in your food. 

By limiting our salt intake, we can reduce our risk for high blood pressure, heart disease and stroke. What do you do to lower your sodium intake?

 

 

 

 

Written By:

Recent Posts

Some Workers Face Higher Risk of Injury – But Employers Can Make a Difference posted on Jul 25

Some Workers Face Higher Risk of Injury – But Employers Can Make a Difference

In the six years from 2008 through 2013, 356 workers died on the job in Massachusetts.  This is about one worker every five days!  The MDPH CFOI and MA FACE projects developed this infographic to illustrate these tragic worker deaths and to underscore the human costs   …Continue Reading Some Workers Face Higher Risk of Injury – But Employers Can Make a Difference

Making Your Summer POP! posted on Jul 19

Making Your Summer POP!

Few things are better than an ice-cold popsicle on a hot summer day!  I have vivid memories from my childhood running around through the sprinkler and various neighbors’ yards enjoying the summer sun.  At that age, having a messy red ring around your mouth from   …Continue Reading Making Your Summer POP!

Massachusetts is Rewarding Small Businesses for Healthy Workplaces posted on Jul 18

Massachusetts is Rewarding Small Businesses for Healthy Workplaces

Wellness programs are good for business. They can lead to better performing workers, lower absenteeism and decreased healthcare and insurance costs. Now, small businesses can be rewarded for these efforts! The Massachusetts Wellness Tax Credit Incentive gives small businesses in Massachusetts a state tax credit   …Continue Reading Massachusetts is Rewarding Small Businesses for Healthy Workplaces