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Break out your red to support heart disease awareness.

Heart disease kills more women than all forms of cancer combined. Join the fight to bring attention to this “silent killer” of women by Wearing Red on February 7.  

The American Heart Association launched Go Red For Women to save lives and raise awareness of heart disease, the leading killer of women (and, in fact, kills more women than men).

  • You may have seen the red dress, the iconic symbol of the battle against heart disease in women. Since the first National Wear Red Day in 2003, tremendous strides have been made in the fight against heart disease in women:  dress
  • 23% more Americans know heart disease is the #1 killer of women, including twice as many Hispanic women and three times the number of African-American women
  • 34% fewer women now die from heart disease, saving 330 lives every day
  • More women have taken ownership of their health by developing healthy lifestyles:

          37% are losing weight and 15% have quit smoking

             43% are checking their cholesterol, with ‘high cholesterol’ down 18%

            50% exercise more

            60% have improved their diets and 33% have developed heart health plans with their doctor

And people continue to join the fight — more than 1.75 million people have registered for Go Red For Women this year, and 25 million Red Dress Pins have been worn to support the cause. GRFW events will take place in 185 cities, and 2,000 landmarks across the country will light up in red on Friday.

This success has spilled over into other important areas. Women no longer pay higher healthcare premiums than men. And 20 states sponsor programs to ensure low-income women are screened for heart disease and stroke through CDC’s WISEWOMAN.

To prevent or control heart disease, keep your blood pressure, cholesterol, and weight in check.  Ask your doctor or healthcare provider about your risk for heart disease. Your doctor may have some good tips for eating better and moving more.

National Wear Red Day

Go Red For Women

American Heart Association

 

 

 

Written By:


Ted works in communications for the Division of Prevention and Wellness at the Massachusetts Department of Public Health.

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