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Our bodies are made up of mostly water, so when our water supply gets too low, the effects can be far reaching. Dehydration upsets the body’s natural balance and can affect our physical, mental, and emotional health. Did you know that being dehydrated can affect your mood?

If you frequently find yourself feeling nervous, easily irritated, or sluggish, you might be in need of some H2O. Just like being hungry can affect our mood, so can being dehydrated. Being even mildly dehydrated can contribute to low energy, anxiety, nervousness, depression, and trouble thinking clearly. Being dehydrated throws off the delicate dopamine and serotonin balances in the brain, natural chemicals that can increase/affect depression and anxiety.

One of the fastest and easiest ways to improve your mood is by drinking a glass (or two!) of water. Getting hydrated can quite literally calm your nerves. Water can also be found in foods we eat. Fruits and veggies like oranges, watermelon, tomatoes, contain high amounts of water.

Try not to wait until you’re already thirsty to fill up, but drink lots of water in between meals. The amount of water you need every day varies by individual and by environmental factors. It’s important to up your water intake when the weather is very hot, during and after exercise, if you are pregnant or nursing, and when you’re sick with a fever, vomiting, or diarrhea. It’s also important to drink lots of extra water when you’ve been through a stressful or traumatic event to flush out cortisol. In stressful times, our bodies produce the stress hormone, cortisol, and too much of this hormone is bad for our bodies.

So do your body, and mind, a favor and fill up on water!

Written By:


Community Suicide Prevention Coordinator

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