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As the weather turns colder, the sky grayer, and the heating bills higher, there are some folks who start thinking about moving to a warmer clime, such as Florida.

Some of those same folks find Florida's tax climate favorable as well, given the absence of an income tax or estate tax in the Sunshine State.

However, before you pack up and go, and before you start spending those income taxes you'll no longer have to pay, there are a host of legal and financial arrangements you'll need to make to ensure that you are no longer a resident of the Bay State.

At the risk of oversimplication (blogger's prerogative), the most fundamental requirement is to spend 183 days or less in Massachusetts during each tax year (and to keep records that vouch for that).

That's the starting point for making the case that your residence is no longer in Massachusetts. But there is lot's more to do.

Click here for detailed information from DOR's website on the ins and outs of domicile. And for a recent article on the subject written from the point of view of a tax lawyer and estate planner, click here.  

Don't forget the sunscreen.

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