Post Content

phelp-logo_color-lores

Every day, U.S. emergency rooms treat more than 300 children for poisoning; every 13 seconds, a Poison Control Center receives a call. More than 90 percent of poisoning incidents occur in the home.

Hazards lurk not only in chemicals marked with warning labels, but ordinary household items as well.  Cleaning products, pesticides, art supplies, and medicine also pose threats — especially to children. Therefore, it’s important to know how to poison proof your home and protect your family.

The main cause of poisoning among U.S. children comes from lead-based paint and dust containing lead. Homes built before 1978 are more likely to contain lead-based paint. As the paint ages, it flakes and becomes a dust that causes health problems for children who inhale it. Massachusetts Lead Law requires homes built before 1978 to be inspected for lead paint. If hazards are found, and a child under six lives there, the home must be deleaded.

Following these seven tips from the Executive Office of Health and Human Services (EOHHS) can help you and your loved ones stay safe and healthy year-round.

  1. Put safety latches on drawers and cabinets containing harmful household products and keep all hazardous materials out of reach of children.
  2. When available, buy products in child-resistant packaging and store all household products and medications in their original wrapping.
  3. Always store food and household cleaners in separate places to avoid contamination.
  4. Keep children away from poisonous plants and pesticides that may be in or around your home.
  5. Watch children carefully when playing indoors and outdoors; know how to handle animal bites and stings.
  6. Protect against the dangers of carbon monoxide by installing CO detectors in your home. Also, never leave a car running inside a garage. Even if the door is open, fumes will build up quickly inside the home.
  7. Post the number for the Regional Center for Poison Control and Prevention, (800) 222-1222, near all telephones in your home.

If you think someone has been poisoned, call the Regional Center for Poison Control and Prevention immediately. Use this emergency checklist to guide you on what information to tell the poison expert on the phone. Do not wait for the victim to look or feel sick. Do not try to treat the person. If the victim has collapsed or is not breathing, call 911 for an ambulance.

What are your poison prevention tips? Comment below or tweet us at @MassGov.

 

infographic image

 

Written By:

Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

Recent Posts

Celebrate Independence Day in Massachusetts posted on Jun 30

Celebrate Independence Day in Massachusetts

As the state where the Boston Tea Party, Battle of Bunker Hill, and first shots of the American Revolution occurred, Massachusetts is a special place to celebrate the 4th of July. Whether you’re looking for a free event for the family or a way to   …Continue Reading Celebrate Independence Day in Massachusetts

Clean Beaches Week: 6 Ways to Protect the Coast posted on Jun 26

Clean Beaches Week: 6 Ways to Protect the Coast

Did you know that the Massachusetts coastline is expansive enough to cover the distance from Boston to Miami on Interstate 95? Learn how you can help preserve over 1,500 miles of the Commonwealth’s coast during Clean Beaches Week, July 1–7. Read these useful tips from   …Continue Reading Clean Beaches Week: 6 Ways to Protect the Coast

The Importance of Protecting Your Home and Family Against Ticks and Mosquitoes posted on Jun 24

The Importance of Protecting Your Home and Family Against Ticks and Mosquitoes

No one wants to spend their summer worrying about ticks and mosquitoes. Although it’s difficult to escape these pests altogether, you can prevent them from infesting your property and minimize itchy bug bites on you and your family. The Department of Public Health (DPH) and   …Continue Reading The Importance of Protecting Your Home and Family Against Ticks and Mosquitoes