Post Content

Nobody likes getting debt collection calls. But have you ever gotten one for a debt you already paid — or you know isn’t yours? Or have you been threatened and harassed by a debt collector until you paid up? If so, we want you to know how to protect yourself.

Today, in partnership with federal and state law enforcement partners, the Federal Trade Commission (FTC) announces Operation Corrupt Collector, a federal-state law enforcement sweep against fake and abusive debt collectors. The operation includes five FTC actions, with two new cases announced today.

In each of the new FTC cases announced today, the companies claimed to be collecting on debt that they can’t legally collect, or that people don’t actually owe. In these cases, the companies made robocalls to people, telling them that they’ve been sued, or soon will be, if they don’t pay up.

In cases announced today by our law enforcement partners, the companies called people claiming to be law enforcement officials or attorneys — scaring people with threats of arrest at their workplace, prison, or suspension of their driver’s license if they didn’t pay right away.

Have you gotten a collection call about a debt you don’t recognize? Before you pay:

  1. Find out who’s calling. Get the name of the collector, the collection company, its address, and phone number.
  1. Get “validation” information about the debt. Within 5 days of first contacting you, debt collectors must “validate” or tell you the amount of the debt, the name of the current creditor, and how to get the name of the original creditor.
  1. Don’t respond to threats. When scammers threaten to arrest you, suspend your driver’s license, or call your employer if you don’t pay immediately, hang up and report the collector to the FTC at gov/complaint.
  1. Do your own detective work. Check with the original creditor. Is the debt yours? Did they sell your debt or hire a company to collect it? If so, is the caller the original creditor’s collector?
  1. Dispute the debt. If you think you don’t owe some — or all — of the debt, dispute it with the collector by mail, or online, even if you got validation information.

Learn more about dealing with debt collection at ftc.gov/debtcollection.

Operation Corrupt Collector

 

Written By:

Tags:

Recent Posts

Halloween During the COVID Era posted on Oct 29

Halloween During the COVID Era

Ordinarily, scary things on Halloween are confined to spooky movies, frightening costumes, and the possibility of tainted goodies, but this year COVID-19 presents additional concerns for trick-or-treaters and those giving out candy. Just as with other activities, precautions can be taken to make Halloween safe   …Continue Reading Halloween During the COVID Era

National Lead Poisoning Prevention Week posted on Oct 29

National Lead Poisoning Prevention Week

October 25 – 31, 2020 – is National Lead Poisoning Prevention Week (NLPPW). The U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD), the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), and their partners have organized this to heighten awareness   …Continue Reading National Lead Poisoning Prevention Week

Cybersecurity Awareness Month: #BeCyberSmart posted on Oct 21

Cybersecurity Awareness Month: #BeCyberSmart

These days the line between our real and online lives is becoming thinner and thinner each day as we are constantly connected to the internet. This is even more true during the pandemic where remote work, home-schooling, and online shopping have become the norm –   …Continue Reading Cybersecurity Awareness Month: #BeCyberSmart