Massachusetts Law Updates

Official Blog of the Massachusetts Trial Court Law Libraries

Category Archives: Law Books and Websites

Codification of Federal Law Today Posted on Sep 26

“The United States Code is prepared and published by the Office of the Law Revision Counsel (“OLRC”) of the U.S. House of Representatives pursuant to 2 U.S.C. 285b. The Code contains the general and permanent laws of the United States, organized into titles based on subject matter.   …Continue Reading Codification of Federal Law Today

Access to Justice: Authentication as a Social Justice Issue Posted on Sep 24

“One of the most serious problems with the trend toward exclusively researching legal material online – and in making certain legal resources available only electronically – is that in most states, there is no system or set of standards for how legal information should be   …Continue Reading Access to Justice: Authentication as a Social Justice Issue

Ensuring Authenticity in the Massachusetts Code Posted on Sep 23

“Providing information online is integral to the conduct of state government in the 21st century. The ease and speed with which information can be created, updated, and distributed electronically, especially in contrast to the time required for the production of print materials, enables governments to   …Continue Reading Ensuring Authenticity in the Massachusetts Code

Accessing the Codification of Massachusetts law in print and online Posted on Sep 19

In the blog post “Codification of Massachusetts law today”, reference is made to the chapter on “Statutes and Session Laws” in Handbook of Legal Research in Massachusetts, which says “The official edition of the General Laws has been published in paperbound format since 1984.” The only official version   …Continue Reading Accessing the Codification of Massachusetts law in print and online

Codification of Massachusetts Law Today Posted on Sep 18

Codification of Massachusetts Law Today

To follow up on yesterday’s blog post, “Historical Codifications of Massachusetts Law”, recodifying the law every twenty years or so became a burdensome process. “Before 1921, few, if any of the Acts and Resolves passed during a legislative session were written to mesh with the   …Continue Reading Codification of Massachusetts Law Today

Historical Codifications of Massachusetts Law Posted on Sep 17

Following up on yesterday’s blog post, “Word(s) of the Month – codification“, we can take a look at historical codifications of Massachusetts law. “The earliest codification of laws in Massachusetts was the 1649 codification, the Book of the General Lawes and Libertyes, which incorporated the   …Continue Reading Historical Codifications of Massachusetts Law

Legal research: print or online? Posted on Sep 27

When doing legal research, is it easier to use online sources or books?  Which produces better results?  Can you even do it all online, if you want to? As part of the answer to this, the Massachusetts Trial Court Law Libraries have a web page   …Continue Reading Legal research: print or online?

Online information: access and veracity Posted on Mar 10

Online information: access and veracity

The Massachusetts Library System recently posted an online guide with resources to help citizens evaluate information online and hone media-literacy skills.  Included is a popular eight-point informational graphic from the International Federation of Library Associations and Institutions and is a concise, single-page tipsheet. One of the points is   …Continue Reading Online information: access and veracity

American Bar Association adds diversity portal to website Posted on Aug 15

“ABA President Paulette Brown (2015-16) led the Diversity and Inclusion 360 Commission in its one-year inquiry into how to develop sustainable action plans that would advance diversity and inclusion in the legal profession, the judicial system and the ABA itself.”  The Commission’s work resulted in policies, online   …Continue Reading American Bar Association adds diversity portal to website

Every Woman Her Own Lawyer Posted on Aug 2

Every Woman Her Own Lawyer

Representing yourself in court without a lawyer is not a new idea. Books designed to help self-represented litigants were published as early as the second quarter of the eighteenth century. “Some earlier books were aimed partly at a non-legal audience, particularly readers dealing with the   …Continue Reading Every Woman Her Own Lawyer