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Famous Trials in American history is a website, created by Professor Douglas O. Linder and maintained by the University of Missouri-Kansas City Law School, that tells the stories of over 70 famous cases, by using a mix of transcripts, testimony, maps, pictures, audio clips, primary documents, links, essays and other materials. Some of the famous cases featured on the site include the Salem Witchcraft trials (1692), the Boston Massacre trials (1770), the Lizzie Borden trial (1893), the Scopes “Monkey” trial (1925), Nuremberg trials (1945-49), the Charles Manson trial (1970-71) and the O.J. Simpson trial (1995).

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Criminal solicitation as a crime posted on Mar 27

Black’s Law Dictionary (10th edition, 2014), defines “criminal solicitation”, under “solicitation” (2), as:   “The criminal offense of urging, advising, commanding, or otherwise inciting another to commit a crime <convicted of solicitation of murder>.   Solicitation is an inchoate offense distinct from the solicited crime.  Under the   …Continue Reading Criminal solicitation as a crime

Massachusetts Declaration of Rights – Selected Secondary Sources posted on Feb 2

Massachusetts Declaration of Rights - Selected Secondary Sources

Selected Secondary Sources From January 1, 2019 through January 30, 2019, Massachusetts Law Updates presented a daily series of blog posts showcasing the 30 Articles in the Declaration of Rights in the Massachusetts Constitution. In addition to the text of the Articles, the posts include   …Continue Reading Massachusetts Declaration of Rights – Selected Secondary Sources

Massachusetts Declaration of Rights – Acknowledgments posted on Feb 1

Massachusetts Declaration of Rights - Acknowledgments

Acknowledgments The series of Massachusetts Law Updates blog posts showcasing the 30 Articles in the Declaration of Rights in the Massachusetts Constitution, posted in January of 2019, would not have been possible had not the articles been drafted by John Adams at his kitchen table   …Continue Reading Massachusetts Declaration of Rights – Acknowledgments