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Standards for access to inmates at correctional facilities afforded to attorneys, law students, paralegals, private investigators and interpreters have been recently updated.

New amendments to 103 CMR 486.00 include reducing the time from one week to three business days to supply documentation of a law student’s or paralegal’s status prior to the first intended visit to an institution.

Incorporated into the new regulation is the allowance of access to inmates by interpreters as well as private investigators. An interpreter’s access is allowed only for the purposes of assisting an attorney and shall have no access unless accompanied by an attorney.

A private investigator who is licensed under M.G.L. c. 147 §25 or exempt from licensing requirements under M.G.L. c. 147 §23, and is working under the authorization and supervision of an attorney or a pro se litigant, or is court-appointed may have access.

Private investigators also have a three business day requirement to produce documentation identifying their status of employment by an attorney and/or court order to secure access.

Upon entry to an institution, proper identification is required including valid bar cards and government-issued photographic identification for attorneys. Law students, paralegals, private investigators and interpreters will need additional documentation and verification found in 103 CMR 486.07.

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