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Kara Ryan

  Kara Ghiringhelli, Department of Public Health

 

Kara Ghiringhelli is a Nutrition Education Specialist at DPH

Americans have a love for sugar. The average American typically eats or drinks about 22 teaspoons of added sugar every day, with sugary beverages being the #1 source.

With sugar consumption on the rise, the American Heart Association recently published updated guidelines on the amount of added sugar we should limit ourselves to every day. The American Heart Association defines added sugar as, ‘sugars or syrups added to foods at the table, during processing, or during preparation.’ In other words, added sugars aren’t found naturally in foods, they are added to make foods even sweeter and tastier. The American Heart Association recommends women consume less than 100 calories or 6 teaspoons of added sugar a day and men consume less than 150 calories or 9 teaspoons of added sugar a day. If the average American is consuming 22 teaspoons a day of added sugar, we are in need of some serious help! Including me, a sweet tooth at heart.

Since these new guidelines were released, it has me thinking, maybe I should re-evaluate my own sugar intake. If you have been trying to limit your daily sugar intake and have tips you’d like to share, we’d love to hear from you!

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