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Lynn D newPosted by:

Lynn Beattie, Department of Public Health.

 

Lynn is a Nutrition Education Specialist with DPH.

 

 

 

 Food_Day_logo

October is the month of national celebrations. Just to name a few, there was Golf Day on October 4th, World Smile Day on October 7th, and Boss’s Day on October 16th. But the national celebration that trumps the rest (in my opinion) is Food Day, today, October 24th! Food Day is a national movement aimed to transform the American Diet, from farm to plate, from the east coast to the west coast. Food Day invites people from all walks of life to take part in promoting healthy eating, eating food from local and sustainable farms and supporting policies that would support those efforts. The six Food Day principles are:

1. Reduce diet-related disease by promoting safe, healthy foods
2. Support sustainable farms & limit subsidies to big agribusiness
3. Expand access to food and alleviate hunger
4. Protect the environment & animals by reforming factory farms
5. Promote health by curbing junk-food marketing to kids
6. Support fair conditions for food and farm workers

Last week we blogged on a few events that are happening all over Massachusetts today. On an individual level, I’ll be celebrating Food Day by taking advantage of the farmers’ markets that are still open in Boston. So you may see me raiding the City Hall Plaza Farmers Market on Mondays or Wednesdays these next few weeks.

It’s not too late for you to participate in this celebration, too! There are lots of Food Day events organized by various groups ranging from universities, companies and restaurants to families, community centers, and local clubs. Browse through the list of events at http://foodday.org/participate/events/ and attend one near your community!

How are YOU celebrating Food Day?

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