Post Content

Summer is here and with it comes celebrations of all kinds such as beach days, barbeques and picnics with family and friends. In addition to good food and company, many of these festivities may include alcohol, so it’s important to remember that anyone who provides alcohol to people under the age of 21 can face criminal charges.

To make sure everyone has a safe and enjoyable time at your next gathering, here are some great alcohol-free celebration ideas:

  • A potluck or BBQ is a great option for those on a budget. Home cooking is affordable and provides an alternative to restaurants. Healthy eating ideas can be found here on the Mass Health Blog
  • You don’t need to limit costume parties to Halloween. Choose a specific era such as the 20s, or have friends surprise you by showing up as their favorite movie characters.
  • Now is the perfect time of year to organize a game of your favorite sport. Kickball, basketball, or baseball are all fun games for any age. For an even bigger event, invite family and friends to create several teams. Create tournament brackets for a mini “playoff”.
  • For the budding artists, host a gallery show in your house. Hang up their photos, drawings, or paintings, or play a group drawing game. One that we particularly like requires only 3 friends, 3 sheets of paper, and the drawing supplies of your choice. Fold your papers accordion style into three sections. Each person will draw the top third of a body connecting the outlines from each body part just over the next fold. Fold the top third over so only the middle section is visible, pass your paper to the person sitting next to you, and draw the next portion of the body. Repeat this process until you’ve completed your body and unfold to see who – or what! – you’ve created!
  • No one will miss alcohol when there is great food and tasty refreshments. Fruit juice, ice tea, or lemonade are great choices for the spring and summer. For a creative twist, try mixing fruit juice or lemonade with your favorite tea over ice.
  • If you or your family would like to avoid parties with alcohol but can’t host your own, your local adult education center may offer great one-day activities in cooking or studio art. Some also offer outdoor events such as hikes or historical tours. Keep an eye out in your local paper for free or discounted public events as well.

If your child is heading to a party on their own, take the time to talk with them about the risks of underage drinking. For resources on how you can start the conversation, visit Mass.gov/maclearinghouse

Written By:


intern with Bureau of Substance Abuse Services

Tags: , , , , , ,

Recent Posts

Elevating the Essential Workforce posted on Apr 11

Elevating the Essential Workforce

Written by Emily Sparer-Fine, Director of the Occupational Health and Surveillance Program Essential workers encompass a wide variety of occupations, many of which are familiar to us: health care workers, police, fire and other emergency personnel, transit workers and grocery workers, while other workers equally   …Continue Reading Elevating the Essential Workforce

Uplifting Mental Health and Wellness posted on Apr 10

Uplifting Mental Health and Wellness

Written by Nicole Schmitt of the Bureau of Substance Addiction Services To address the needs of individuals at high risk for overdose and other medical complications associated with substance use, the Massachusetts Department of Public Health (DPH) Bureau of Substance Addiction Services awarded contracts to   …Continue Reading Uplifting Mental Health and Wellness

Building COVID-19 Resilience for Families of Children with Special Health Needs posted on Apr 9

Building COVID-19 Resilience for Families of Children with Special Health Needs

Written by Elaine Gabovitch of the Bureau of Family Health and Nutrition Emergency care plans (ECPs) are important tools that families of children with special health needs can use to prepare for their children’s safety and wellbeing during COVID-19 and other health related emergencies. Having   …Continue Reading Building COVID-19 Resilience for Families of Children with Special Health Needs