Post Content

February has arrived and many workers feel like they have finally gotten back into their daily routines—unless you are a parent of school-attending children. Many public schools offer a break from classes this month and it is common for working teens to pick up extra hours during that time, especially for the young workers who have jobs in retail and food service. This is all expected and we want to offer the Legal Work Hours for Minors section of the Massachusetts Child Labor Laws in order to make sure working teens keep their safety as a priority.

The Child Labor Laws target two different age groups: 14 & 15-year-olds and 16 & 17-year-olds. Find the applicable regulations in the table below. Also, don’t forget that all teens under 18 must have a Work Permit from the school district where they live or go to school.

legal-work-hours-infographic

Written By:


Health Communicator and Outreach Specialist in the Occupational Health Surveillance Program

Tags: , , , , , , , , ,

Recent Posts

Building COVID-19 Resilience for Families of Children with Special Health Needs posted on Apr 9

Building COVID-19 Resilience for Families of Children with Special Health Needs

Written by Elaine Gabovitch of the Bureau of Family Health and Nutrition Emergency care plans (ECPs) are important tools that families of children with special health needs can use to prepare for their children’s safety and wellbeing during COVID-19 and other health related emergencies. Having   …Continue Reading Building COVID-19 Resilience for Families of Children with Special Health Needs

Galvanizing Climate Justice posted on Apr 8

Galvanizing Climate Justice

Written by Marc Nascarella, Meg Blanchet, and Kate Adams of the Bureau of Environmental Health The Massachusetts Department of Public Health (DPH) supports climate justice. The Department’s Bureau of Environment Health’s work specifically supports local climate adaptations for the most vulnerable in our communities.  A   …Continue Reading Galvanizing Climate Justice

Working to Prevent Overdose Deaths in Massachusetts posted on Apr 7

Working to Prevent Overdose Deaths in Massachusetts

Written by Brittni Reilly and MaryKate Duska of the Bureau of Substance Addiction Services The overdose crisis in Massachusetts takes a significant toll on communities. Since 2016, Massachusetts has lost approximately 2,000 lives a year to overdose deaths. The increased presence of fentanyl in the   …Continue Reading Working to Prevent Overdose Deaths in Massachusetts