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MBTA HoverboardsEffective immediately, hoverboards are prohibited on all MBTA property, including stations, buses, subways, trains, and commuter boats.

MBTA subway and bus personnel, along with Keolis Commuter Rail staff have been informed that customers with hoverboards shall not be permitted to bring such devices into MBTA stations and onboard MBTA vehicles. There are no exceptions.

Due to a string of recent injuries, fires and explosions associated with hoverboards nationwide, the MBTA conducted an assessment of the devices and determined that they are a safety risk. As a result, they are banned from MBTA property. The assessment incorporated findings, recommendations, and corrective actions that are in line with other transit systems throughout the country.

Hoverboards can catch fire. Failures in the Lithium-ion battery that powers such devices are the root cause of the self-combusting fires. Battery failures are caused by issues ranging from external abuse to cell manufacturing. Currently, there are no safety standards regulating the design and manufacturing of these devices in the United States. MBTA rules do not allow articles of an inflammable or explosive nature to be carried into any station or into or upon any passenger vehicle.

A potential fire ignited by a hoverboard can expose customers to smoke and toxic gas, which can result in injury or death. They also increase the risk of personal injury to riders due to falls, collisions, as well as the possibility of falling into the train pit.

Transit authorities in New York, California, and Chicago, in addition to major domestic airlines have restricted customers from boarding their systems with hoverboards. MBTA personnel and MBTA Police will inform customers of the ban if they are found on MBTA property with the devices in their possession, and will enforce the ban as needed. Placards and signs to notify the public about the ban on hoverboards on MBTA vehicles and in stations – such as the example below – will be posted at appropriate locations throughout the T’s transit system in the coming weeks. In addition, the MBTA today is using its 80 digital panels and social media beginning today to inform riders about this prohibition.

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